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Publication Date: 16 Jul 2015
Publisher: SPCK Publishing
Author: Fraser Dyer
ISBN-13: 9780281072484, 9780281072491

Who Are We To Judge

By Fraser Dyer
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ISBN: 9780281072484
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ISBN: 9780281072491
Jesus says ‘Do not judge’ yet our human instinct often leads us to harsh judgements of others. In a world where snap judgements are made in seconds on social media, how can Christians resist the urge to join in?

Christians may be especially adept at dressing up their
judgement of others as righteousness and being a witness for Christ without recognising the psychological and spiritual
pitfalls. It remains easier to point the finger at clearer and more
observable sins than to recognise the way judgementalism corrupts us.

In this insightful and wise book, Fraser Dyer helps us to understand
what compels Christians to be judgemental towards others. He
explores the condemnation of judgementalism throughout scripture, and particularly in the ministry and teaching of
Christ. He also includes a set of practical approaches, rooted in
Christian spirituality, to enable us to journey from the self-righteousness of judgementalism towards love of God and neighbour.
About the Author
The Revd Fraser Dyer is an Anglican priest in an inner-city parish in south London. Prior to ordination, he worked in the voluntary sector, leading volunteer programmes for Traidcraft and Greenpeace UK, before spending twenty years as a consultant
and trainer. He is the author of Why do I do this every day? Finding meaning in your work (Lion Hudson, 2005).
Press Reviews

Dryer admits that for many years, his own judgements have been anything but gentle against the Church and the behaviour and beliefs of fellow Christians. How did we get to this state where judgementalism is so common? How do we avoid it?

Dryer approaches these questions by first analysing why we feel we must judge others. He then goes on to examine Jesus’ teaching and concludes by saying we need discernment and an informed and generous attitude, rather than hasty judgements.

The book is well structured and logical in its approach, and while Dyer is dealing with a complex topic, his writing is not academic or dry. Thanks to Dyer’s approachable and frequently humorous style, this book could be read by an older teenager or adult, providing they are willing to have their presuppositions and prejudices challenged. It could also be used profitably as a study book for a home group.

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