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Publication Date: 17 Jul 2014
Publisher: Marylebone House
Page Count: 328
Author: Catherine Fox
ISBN-13: 9781910674284, 9781910674291

Acts and Omissions

(Lindchester Chronicles 1)
By Catherine Fox
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ISBN-13
9781910674284-grouped
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Paperback
ISBN: 9781910674284
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£9.99
eBook
ISBN: 9781910674291
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Summary
The Bishop of Lindchester is happily married with four daughters. But does he have a secret? Archdeacon Matt is inclined to think not. That said, it's obvious to him that Bishop Paul's got a pretty big bee in his mitre about the brilliant but troubled Freddie May . . . Welcome to the fictional Diocese of Lindchester, where you will be taken (dear reader) on a yearlong romp in the company of bishops, priests and lay people. Prepare yourself for a bumpy and hilarious ride from the rarefied heights of the Cathedral Close down to the coalface of ordinary urban and rural parishes. Acts and Omissions reveals the Church of England in all its mess and glory. It is a world shot through with grace, but one where even the best intentioned err and stray. And occasionally do those things which they ought not to have done . . .
About the Author
Catherine Fox is an established and popular author. Her debut novel, Angels and Men (reissued in 2014) was a Sunday Times Pick of the Year. Her other books include The Benefits of Passion and Love for the Lost (reissued in 2015), and the second and third volume in the Lindchester Chronicles series (of which Acts and Omissions is the first), Unseen Things Above (2015) and Realms of Glory (2017). Catherine lectures at Manchester Metropolitan University and is married to the Bishop of Sheffield.
Press Reviews

The novel brims with wit and heart, acknowledging the awkwardness and consolations of Anglicanism in the twenty-first century. Hugely entertaining and highly recommended.

- Richard Beard, author of Lazarus is Dead

This is a funny, affectionate, and devastatingly accurate portrayal of the Church of England today... in fact its literary heritage is altogether impeccable.

...she brings a sharp and exceptionally well-informed eye to bear on the foibles of the C of E...

The plot is, however, driven by her wickedly observed characters , operating within a framework that will be immediately familiar to Anglican readers, but whose mysteries are skilfully explained for others.

Her setting, in the cathedral city of Lindchester, is a world that is both fictional and familiar. Her narrative incorporates snatches of favourite hymns; unexpected theological revelations catch at the back of the throat as they bring a bible passage movingly to life.

Underlying the racy and eminently plausible storyline, however, is a profound exploration of the big themes of judgement and mercy; above all, of love.

TWO health warnings: the publishers have produced the book in a horribly small font (read it on Kindle if you can, and adjust the type size to suit yourself). And the language - as befits some of what it describes - is, er, vernacular. But, mostly, that adds to the fun, even if it also makes for a mind-broadening read.

- Caroline Chartes

Janet Beer, vice-chancellor, University of Liverpool, has some seasonal advice for readers. “Unsure what to buy the Trollope devotee in your life for Christmas? Look no further than Catherine Fox’s Acts and Omissions (SPCK, 2014) and Unseen Things Above (Marylebone House, 2015) for a refresher course not only in cathedral politics, but also a set of profound, although lightly drawn, insights into the contemporary Anglican communion. This is not pastiche: Fox’s voice is not Trollope’s, it is her own – witty, meddling, compassionate – and in this last regard she most resembles her predecessor. The men and women of the church in Fox’s world go about their professional and personal lives much as the rest of us do. They are susceptible to temptation, and to the odd bit of inappropriate behaviour, but in the main their stories are compelling because the ethical dilemmas that afflict us all from time to time are their daily bread but exotic fare for most readers.

- Janet Beer

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